Jun 23
2017

Today they broke ground on the new St. Petersburg Pier and Tampa Bay video production company CMR Studios is already documenting the new construction with time lapse cameras just as they did the demolition. This will bring full circle a video project that began in August of 2015, the waterfront site was supposed to be cleared of the inverted pyramid and approach in about six months. That initial prediction was way off. As a result the three solar powered camera installations shot an image every five minutes for over a year. That totaled some 315,360 images that were edited into a dramatic time lapse video that belies the months it has been underway. The result is an edited time lapse video of just a minute and a half.

Adam Weber from Tampa Video Production company CMR

Adam Weber, the photographer and producer of the project, visited each camera on a weekly basis to perform maintenance and offload the images to create the video. That included climbing onto the roof of the Birchwood Hotel on Beach Drive in downtown St. Petersburg. That camera provided a dramatic elevated clear view of the entire pier. Another camera was placed at the St. Petersburg Marina for a water level view of the south side of The Pier and another at the Vinoy Marina captured the demolition on the north side. The three locations insured that all the action would be captured and shown in the final edited video.

Incrementally throughout the year the images were processed and edited to delete periods of inactivity. And even though the cameras were mounted firmly, camera shake that would not be visible in normal speed video became very apparent. So the thousands of images had to be processed and stabilized.

View the St. Pete Pier demolition time lapse video here.

Taking the process even further, Adam selected images from each camera that matched the lighting conditions and color from frame to frame and represented dramatic changes in the structure to create GIFs from each angle that are just a few seconds long.

This multi-year time lapse video will become part of the historical archives at the St. Petersburg History Museum which sits on the approach to The Pier.

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Aug 25
2016

The beginning of the end of the iconic St. Petersburg Pier was one year ago. Tampa Bay video production company CMR Studios was set to document the demolition with three strategically located time lapse cameras. It began in August of 2015, the waterfront site was supposed to be cleared of the inverted pyramid and approach in about six months. That initial prediction was way off. As a result the three solar powered camera installations have been shooting an image every five minutes for, thus far, a year. That totals some 315,360 images that have now been edited into a dramatic time lapse video that belies the months it has been underway. The result is an edited time lapse video of just a minute and a half.

Adam Weber from Tampa Video Production company CMR

Adam Weber, the photographer and producer of the project, visited each camera on a weekly basis to perform maintenance and offload the images to create the video. That included climbing onto the roof of the Birchwood Hotel on Beach Drive in downtown St. Petersburg. That camera provided a dramatic elevated clear view of the entire pier. Another camera was placed at the St. Petersburg Marina for a water level view of the south side of The Pier and another at the Vinoy Marina captured the demolition on the north side. The three locations insured that all the action would be captured and shown in the final edited video.

Incrementally throughout the year the images were processed and edited to delete periods of inactivity. And even though the cameras were mounted firmly, camera shake that would not be visible in normal speed video became very apparent. So the thousands of images had to be processed and stabilized.

View the St. Pete Pier demolition time lapse video here.

Taking the process even further, Adam selected images from each camera that matched the lighting conditions and color from frame to frame and represented dramatic changes in the structure to create GIFs from each angle that are just a few seconds long.

The production is not yet complete. Filming continues of the demolition of the approach. Then the cameras, and Adam, will get a rest before capturing the construction of the new pier to bring this multi-year time lapse video full circle. The video will become part of the historical archives at the St. Petersburg History Museum which sits on the approach to The Pier.

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Jul 23
2016

Tampa Video Production logo file preference for your commercial or videoIt’s not unusual for clients to send us their logo to use in their video production, web video or commercial. After all, that’s one of the most important parts of your identity. It’s important too that it look great in HD.  Yes, even onine video is now High Definition. All too often we get a little thumbnail that they actually grab from their own website. Unfortunately, it seems that many designers don’t give clients the proper file type for distribution to different mediums, like print and video. JPEGs are the most common. The problem with those files is that they don’t re-size well and they don’t have transparency to overlay the video on a background without having it appear in a white box. I found a great website that explains the differences. It’s clever name says it all. www.NOjpeg.org

The bottom line is that when we are gathering assets for your production we would prefer that you send us an EPS file of your logo. If you don’t have one, you should request one from your designer. Send us a copy and keep a copy in you archives. If that isn’t possible, or if you want us to create a new logo for you, our Art Director Marina can create one for you from whatever file you send us. Even if it’s that little website thumbnail. Then you will have it for all of your video productions and even print jobs too. If you are new to video productions and need a little help there are a lot of video production companies to help you make the best video.

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Jun 20
2016

The beer coffee creative connection ifographicThe creative process is an amazing thing. Getting that spark of an idea is a rush. Bringing a video, commercial, radio spot to life here in the studios brings a definite feeling of satisfaction. But sometimes it seems the creative ideas will never come. There has always been that adage of “Write drunk, edit sober.” Now it seems there is proof that it is true.

In an article by Mikel Cho at ooomf.com he cites that neuroscientists have studied the “eureka moment” and found that in order to produce moments of insight, you need to feel relaxed so front brain thinking can move to the back of the brain and activate the small spot above your right ear responsible for moments of insight. Researchers found that about 5 seconds before you have a ‘eureka moment’ there is a large increase in alpha waves that activates that. These alpha waves are associated with relaxation, which explains why you often get ideas while you’re on a walk, in the shower, or… on the toilet.

Extensive research on the subject (in actual laboratories not just bars)  shows that alcohol frees up your brain to think more creatively by reducing your ability to pay attention to the stuff going on around you and relaxes you to produce a similar effect on alpha waves. That helps you get creative insights.

The Creative Director Test

Author Dave Birss brought together a group of 18 advertising creative directors and split them into two teams. One was allowed to drink as much alcohol as they wanted while the other team had to stay sober. The groups were given a creative brief and had to come up with as many ideas as they could in three hours. These ideas were then graded by a collection of top creative directors.

The result? The team of drinkers not only produced the most ideas but also came up with four of the top five best ideas.

You have the ideas, now how about some coffee?

Caffeine studies show that coffee can increase quality and performance if the task you are doing seems easy and doesn’t require too much abstract thinking. So, after you have an initial idea or a plan laid out, a cup of coffee can help you follow through on your concept faster without compromising quality.

Always In Moderation – Legal Disclaimer

If you decide to drink coffee or beer while you’re working, stick to no more than 2 drinks per sitting and try not to do this more than once or twice per week to prevent dependency. Coffee and beer shouldn’t be thought of as magic bullets for creativity. If you have to choose between coffee or beer, think about what type of task you are about to do and make sure you don’t over-do it.

So, if you’ve got some great ideas you want to produce, our coffee is always ready. Of course we’ll also be happy to go out for a couple of beers.

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